NHANES Kids Research Abstract

CONSUMPTION OF CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IS ASSOCIATED WITH GREATER TOTAL VEGETABLE AND FRUIT CONSUMPTION, BETTER DIET QUALITY AND INCREASED NUTRIENT INTAKE IN CHILDREN: NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY (NHANES) 2001-2010. Freedman MR, Fulgoni V.  Department of Nutrition, Food Science & Pkg, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA and Nutrition Impact, LLC, Battle Creek, MI.

 

Dr Marjorie Freedman

The objective of this study was to assess, using NHANES 2001-2010 data, the consumption of canned fruits and vegetables (CF+CV) by children, and to analyze dietary and physiological differences among consumers and non-consumers. NHANES data were based on one 24-hour recall. Diet quality was calculated using the Health Eating Index-2010 (HEI). Children (n=2,066) who consumed CF+CV, as compared to non-consumers, had higher total vegetable intake (2.7±0.05 v 2.1±0.03) and total higher total fruit intake (2.8±0.08 v 2.4±0.04). Their Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI) score was significantly higher (P<0.0001) than non-consumers (45.8 ± 0.5 v 43.3 ± 0.3, consumers v. non-consumers, respectively). Children who consumed CF+CV also ate more protein, fiber, vitamin A, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and choline, and less fat. Sodium intake was not different in children who consumed CF+CV, as compared to non-consumers. These data show that consumption of CF+CV was associated with higher nutrient intakes, and a higher diet quality in children. While children who consumed CF+CV ate more energy and total sugar, their body weight, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure was comparable to non-consumers. CF+CV thus make important contributions to the diets of American children.