Food and Nutrition Policy

Nutrition & Food Experts Agree: All Forms Count 

"It's a fact that buying frozen and canned produce may be a better choice when out of season. These are packed when ripe...and are much less expensive.” – Phil Lempert, The “Supermarket Guru,” SunTimes.com, 1/19/11

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"Beans can always be cooked from scratch, but they are just as healthy from a can. All you need to do is open the can and rinse them off, and they are ready to eat.” – Jane Schwartz Harrison, Registered Dietician/Staff Nutritionist, MyOptumHealth, NBC26.com, 2/24/11 

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"Frozen, canned or dried foods are just as nutritious as their fresh counterparts because they are packaged at their nutrient peak.” – Cynthia Held, Registered Dietician, USAToday.com, 3/8/11 

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"Canned beans are a terrific source of fiber and a good source of protein. Drain the water and rinse the beans to remove a good deal of the sodium. Other canned vegetables such as green beans, tomatoes, corn, peas, carrots, even pumpkin (and more) are good too...Canned fruit is a healthy, nutrient dense choice too, as long as you choose varieties that are canned in their own juice without added sugar ... Finally, canned chicken is a good lean protein option, and canned tuna and salmon packed in water are an economical way to get protein and heart healthy omega 3s twice a week as recommended by the American Heart Association.” – Dr. Melina Jampolis, Diet and Fitness Expert, CNN.com, 3/18/11 

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"A study at the University of Illinois found that a great deal of canned fruit and vegetables contains the same amount of dietary fiber and vitamins as their fresh equivalents.” – William Leigh, Health & Medicine Blogger, Foxnews.com, 3/25/11 

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"Myth: Buy only fresh food. Fact: Fresh, canned and frozen foods provide nutritional value for our diets.” – Becky Reid, Family and Consumer Sciences Agent, Chicago Sun-Times, 4/5/11

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“Parents can feel good about serving canned veggies.” – Kathleen Miller, Certified Dietician/Nutritionist and President of the Hudson Valley Dietetic Association, TimesUnion.com, 4/4/11 

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"Fresher is not always better. There are many instances where frozen or canned fruits and vegetables can actually be a healthier option for you. Because much of our produce is picked very early in the ripening process, shipped long distances, sprayed with gasses like ethylene (to ripen), exposed to heat and light, and can even sit around for up to two weeks before it finally hits your shopping cart, many of the nutrients that could have been in that product simply don’t exist when found in your grocer’s produce department.” – Josh Elledge, CEO Savings Angel Inc., MLive. com, 6/7/11 

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"Canned fruits can be every bit as good for you as fresh ones.” – Ruth Frechman, Registered Dietitian and Spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, TCpalm.com, 7/20/11 

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"Both fresh produce and canned or frozen fruits and vegetables are options for schools; the latter retain their nutritional content and can, in some cases, be a more cost effective alternative....” – Dr. Ruth Kava, American Council on Science and Health Senior Fellow in Nutrition, ACSH.org, 7/20/11 

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